Bienvenue! Inscrivez-vous et rejoignez notre communauté :)
  • Login:

Bienvenue sur Forum SIG - Systèmes d'Information Géographique et Géomatique.

Bienvenue sur le forumSIG. S'il s'agit de votre première visite, assurez vous de faire une recherche préalable dans les FAQ SIG. Vous devez vous inscrire avant de pouvoir poster.

Page 1 sur 2 12 DernièreDernière
Affichage des résultats 1 à 15 sur 19
  1. #1
    Biblioman
    Date d'inscription
    mai 2005
    Localisation
    Villeurbanne
    Âge
    36
    Messages
    3 293

    Par défaut Des jolies cartes en oursins

    http://blogs.esri.com/Support/blogs/...th-ArcGIS.aspx

    Creating Radial Flow Maps with ArcGIS

    By Mamata Akella, Design Cartographer

    Flow maps show the movement of some phenomenon, normally goods or people, from one place to another. Lines are used to symbolize the flow, typically varied in width to represent differences in the quantity of the flow. In broad terms there are three main types of flow map: radial, network and distributive. Radial flow maps have a spoke-like pattern because the features and places are mapped in nodal form with one place being a common origin or destination. Network flow maps are used to show interconnectivity between places and are usually based on transportation or communication linkages. Distributive flow maps typically show the distribution of commodities or some other flow that diffuses from origins to multiple destinations.
    In this blog, I show you how to create a radial flow map that depicts multiple origins converging on a single destination. For these types of flow maps, the precise route of flow is not as important as the general direction. A good example of this type of map is the airline route map you might see in the back of an airline magazine with multiple origins travelling to an airline hub.
    The map that we created to demonstrate this concept was made for this year's Making Beautiful Maps technical workshop at the Esri International User Conference. Entitled ArcAttendees: The 2011 Esri UC Global Gathering, the map shows what cities people came from to attend the User Conference (Figure 1).

    Figure 1: A radial flow map showing the city of origin for attendees to Esri UC 2011 in San Diego, CA.
    This blog covers the following topics to show how this map was made:

    • Data requirements
    • Flowline construction
    • Data processing steps
    • Symbolization
    • Projection and layout

    Data requirements
    Esri's Marketing Department supplied a table of attendee data (Figure 2), that contained the following information:

    • a field GEONAMEID that is a unique identifier connected to our cities dataset;
    • the city and country that attendees were coming from (FIRST_ENG, FIRST_CNTR,);
    • the xy coordinates for each city of origin (POINT_X, POINT_Y); and
    • the xy coordinates for the destination city, San Diego, CA (DESTINATION_X, DESTINATION_Y).


    Figure 2: 2011 Esri UC attendee data
    We also used a feature class of cities also attributed with the same GEONAMEID field that exists in the attendee data; and a continent feature class used to symbolize the flow lines according to continent of origin. The continent feature class was also used to symbolize the background on the final map.
    Flowline construction
    To create the flowlines, we used the new XY to Line tool in ArcGIS 10. The XY to Line tool uses origin and destination values as inputs from a table and creates a new linear feature class that represents the path connecting these two points.
    The XY to Line tool is located in the Data Management Toolbox > Features Toolset. Figure 3 illustrates the parameters we defined for the tool:

    Figure 3: XY to Line Tool

    • Input Table: Attendee data (in .csv format)
    • Output Feature Class: feature class named UCAttendee_XYtoLine
    • Start X Field: POINT_X field from the attendee data
    • Start Y Field: POINT_Y field from the attendee data
    • End X Field: DESTINATION_X field from the attendee data
    • End Y Field: DESTINATION_Y field from the attendee data
    • Line Type: here there are four options: GEODESIC, GREAT_CIRCLE, RHUMB_LINE, or NORMAL_SECTION. For this map we needed to create curved lines that represent the shortest great circle path between the origins and destinations. Geodesic lines create a straight line based on a spheroid. Great Circle lines are similar but are used for spheres. A rhumb line calculates the line of constant bearing and normal section creates a straight line directly on a spheroid. For this application, any of the first three of the options would work to approximate the arc of a great circle between the origin and destinations. We used GEODESIC lines simply because it gave us the best appearance when projected.
    • ID (Optional): here we added the GEONAMEID field from our data to give each flowline created the same ID as the input table which is important for later steps
    • Spatial Reference (Optional): we kept the default GCS_WGS_1984 (we'll describe later in the blog how we modified the projections for our maps).

    Figure 4 shows the results of running the XY to line tool on the attendee data displayed using the default GCS_WGS_1984 coordinate system and Figure 5 shows the associated attribute data for the new linear feature class. There were 1532 unique origins in the attendee data with a line created between each of those and the destination in San Diego.

    Figure 4: Result of the XY to Line Tool

    Figure 5: The attribute table for the results of the XY to Line Tool
    So we now have our basic lines and can begin to attribute, project and symbolize them to show the data effectively.
    Data Processing and Symbolization
    Since we wanted to symbolize the unique lines by continent of origin and also add some points to the map to indicate the cities of origin, we joined the city dataset attributes to the flowline dataset attribute table based on the GEONAMEID field. This adds the continent field data to the flowline dataset giving us a way to differentiate each flowline qualitatively on the final map.
    Symbolizing the Flowlines
    We symbolized the flowline features using Categories > Unique Values (Figure 6) and the Continent field we joined to the flowline data. We chose highly saturated colors that contrasted well with the dark blue background being used to symbolize the map background (Figure 7).

    Figure 6: Unique colors assigned to the lines by continent

    Figure 7: Vivid colors used to symbolize the flowlines contrasted well with the dark blue background map detail.
    Symbolizing the City Points
    We symbolized the city points using a circle from the Esri Default Marker font. We set the size to 3 points and made them a bright yellow (Figure 8). The use of a highly saturated yellow was chosen to compliment the flowlines and create a fiber optic appearance.

    Figure 8: The Symbol Property Editor dialog for the city point symbology
    Projection and layout
    The way in which we arrange the data on the final map needed careful consideration given the distribution of the flowlines. Figure 9 illustrates the data focused on the USA and shows clearly that the lines coalesce to the extent the effect is seriously compromised. We needed to find a way of disentangling some of this detail.

    Figure 9: The majority of attendees are from the contiguous 48 United States
    The majority of attendees came from the contiguous 48 United States. As Figure 9 illustrates, this data obscures a lot of other detail and, in particular the pattern in relation to international attendees. Here, then, is a perfect example of the need for using two maps to show the different distributions: an inset map for attendees from outside the contiguous 48 and a main map of those from the contiguous 48. The decision was taken to illustrate the data this way due to the higher number of attendees from the contiguous 48 states while ensuring prominence is given to international attendees on a separate map.
    The world inset map is projected using the Winkel tripel projection that allowed the lines to curve in a visually appealing way. It's a good compromise projection where shape, area, distance and direction aren't highly distorted (Figure 10). We modified the central meridian to -120 degrees to center the map on San Diego, CA.

    Figure 10: Defining a World Winkel tripel projection for the world inset map
    For the map of the contiguous 48 states, we used the World Vertical Perspective projection to create the effect we often see in airline route maps of flowlines moving towards a hub. Here, we wanted San Diego on the horizon with lines travelling towards the city. The fact San Diego is in the lower left corner of the USA meant we were able to modify the projection to achieve this effect as all lines were originating between north and east of the destination. We adjusted the Longitude of Center to -90 degrees (near the tip of the Yucatan Peninsula) and the Latitude of Center to 25 degrees (around southern Louisiana). Finally, we also modified the Height value to give the finished effect (Figure 11).

    Figure 11: The Projected Coordinate System Properties for the contiguous 48 map
    The final flowline map is a combination of using new tools in ArcGIS, an interesting dataset and a focused design to create a visually stimulating and effective representation. With the addition of some tabulated statistics summarizing travel information by continent for the Esri UC attendees and arranging the saturated map foregrounds against a light gray background and white map surround we created a strong figure-ground. The use of the new XY to Line tool provides a powerful way to begin to visualize data in innovative ways using ArcGIS, in particular to begin to explore the use of flow maps to depict the characteristics of related points.
    Future blogs will explore ways of using ArcGIS to create distributive and network maps where our focus turns to displaying different flowline quantities either between an origin and destination of through a transportation network

    Filed under: Cartographic Design, ArcGIS Methods, Symbology, Page Layout, ArcGIS 10

    Comments

    No Comments

    Anonymous comments are disabled
    About makella

    Mamata joined Esri in October of 2008. She is working with Charlie Frye on an online topographic map as well as a variety of city level base map designs. Mamata completed her Masters of Science degree in Geography at the Pennsylvania State University and her Bachelor of Arts degree in Geography at the University of California–Santa Barbara. During her graduate studies at Penn State, Mamata was a teaching assistant for cartography and remote sensing, as well as a research assistant. Her research projects included work with Dr. Alan MacEachren on the Pennsylvania Cancer Atlas and with her adviser, Dr. Cynthia Brewer, on a redesign of the USGS topographic map. Her thesis research focused on testing the comprehension of emergency map symbols by first responders.
    Home is where the .arc is...
    Propos sous license Beerware !!!

  2. #2
    Admin' Général Supporter(rice)

    Date d'inscription
    septembre 2003
    Localisation
    ...dans mon TARDIS
    Organisme
    Bad Wolf
    Âge
    38
    Messages
    9 710

    Mes réseaux sociaux

    Follow Le Docteur On Twitter

    Par défaut

    Très intéressant, merci
    >>>>>>>> Pas d'assistance technique par email ou mp : le forum est là pour ça <<<<<<<<<<<<


  3. #3
    Biblioman
    Date d'inscription
    mai 2005
    Localisation
    Villeurbanne
    Âge
    36
    Messages
    3 293

    Par défaut

    on en reparle sur arcorama
    http://www.arcorama.fr/2011/09/conse...phier-des.html
    Conseils à la carte - Cartographier des flux





    La question de représenter des flux entre des points d'origine et une (ou plusieurs) destination(s) est une problématique récurrente en cartographie. Il existe plusieurs solutions dans ArcGIS pour générer automatiquement les entités qui correspondent des flux. Dans cet article, je fais un rapide point sur deux solutions que j'ai eu l'occasion d'utiliser dernièrement.


    L'outil de création d'oursins




    L'outil de création d'oursins (Spider) développé par un de mes collègues d'Esri France permet de créer des oursins à partir d'une couche de points d'origine et d'une couche de points de destination. Un attribut commun dans ces deux couches est nécessaire pour faire le lien entre chaque point destination et le point d'origine qui lui est associé.




    Dans certains cas, vous ne disposez pas directement dans la table attributaire de la couche destination d'un attribut faisant la correspondance mais d'une table externe indiquant les relations origine-destination. Il faudra préalablement réaliser une jointure entre la couche destination et cette table de correspondance pour vous remettre dans le contexte nécessité par l'outil de création d'oursins.


    Si vous souhaitez relier automatiquement les points destination au point d'origine le plus proche, vous pouvez utiliser l'outil standard d'ArcGIS "Near" (en français l'outil se nomme "Proche") disponible avec le niveau de licence ArcInfo.. Deux champs seront alors ajoutés et en particulier le champ NEAR_FID qui contiendra l'identifiant des entités d'origine.




    L'outil de création de ligne par coordonnées


    Une autre solution consiste à exploiter une table contenant les coordonnées XY des points d'origine et de destination. Vous pouvez alors utiliser l'outil standard d'ArcGIS "XY To Line" (en français l'outil se nomme "XY vers Ligne") pour construire les lignes de flux. L'avantage de cette méthode est de permettre la construction de lignes droites ou prenant en compte la géodésie. Ainsi, si vos flux s'appliquent à de longues distances, ils peuvent être plus réalistes et intégrer les déformations dues au système de coordonnée de la carte.




    Cet excellent article du blog "Mapping Center", explique en détail la procédure.





    Publié par Gaëtan Lavenu à l'adresse 16:25
    Home is where the .arc is...
    Propos sous license Beerware !!!

  4. #4

    Date d'inscription
    février 2010
    Localisation
    Annemasse
    Emploi
    Cartographe
    Messages
    187

    Par défaut

    Bonjour,

    merci pour l'info c'est ce que je cherche à faire depuis quelques temps.

    J'ai juste une question, je suis un peu nul en anglais et je ne pense pas l'avoir vu!
    Cette manipulation ne fonctionne que sur des fichiers de point?
    Je m'explique, l'INSEE fournie un fichier (bien difficile à trouver et comprendre) des déplacements domicile-travail mais il se rapporte à des communes donc des surfaciques.
    Selon vous est il possible de le faire tout de même ou faut il créé un point par commune avec coordonnées X et Y?

    Merci d'avance

    Naish

  5. #5
    Biblioman
    Date d'inscription
    mai 2005
    Localisation
    Villeurbanne
    Âge
    36
    Messages
    3 293

    Par défaut

    à partir d'une couche de points d'origine et d'une couche de points de destination
    à priori
    Home is where the .arc is...
    Propos sous license Beerware !!!

  6. #6

    Date d'inscription
    février 2010
    Localisation
    Annemasse
    Emploi
    Cartographe
    Messages
    187

    Par défaut

    Merci!
    C'est dommage tout de même pour ma couche de surfacique! Ou alors je crée un point par communes

  7. #7
    Biblioman
    Date d'inscription
    mai 2005
    Localisation
    Villeurbanne
    Âge
    36
    Messages
    3 293

    Par défaut

    Citation Envoyé par Naish Voir le message
    Merci!
    C'est dommage tout de même pour ma couche de surfacique! Ou alors je crée un point par communes
    voui, le centroide par ex.
    Home is where the .arc is...
    Propos sous license Beerware !!!

  8. #8

    Date d'inscription
    février 2010
    Localisation
    Annemasse
    Emploi
    Cartographe
    Messages
    187

    Par défaut

    J'avais totalement oublié cette fonction!! Merci j'ai mes centroides, j'ai plus qu'a repasser sur la version ArcGIS 10 pour tester les cartes en oursins

  9. #9

    Date d'inscription
    octobre 2011
    Messages
    24

    Par défaut

    Merci pour toutes ces infos super utiles !

  10. #10

    Date d'inscription
    janvier 2013
    Messages
    1

    Par défaut

    Merci à vous !
    Votre aide a été très précieuse.

    Bonne soirée

  11. #11

    Date d'inscription
    février 2007
    Localisation
    Montreal
    Emploi
    Géomaticien
    Organisme
    Vélo-Québec
    Âge
    42
    Messages
    48

    Par défaut Re : Des jolies cartes en oursins

    Bonjour,

    Est-ce que l'outils "Spider" est-il toujours disponible pour ArcGIS, car le lien en fonctionne plus

    Merci de votre réponse

  12. #12
    Quasi-modo Supporter(rice)

    Date d'inscription
    octobre 2008
    Messages
    998

    Par défaut Re : Des jolies cartes en oursins

    Bonjour,
    Apparemment c'est toujours >LA<.
    "Les sigé, c'est la balle !"
    Joey StarApic et Kool Shape du groupe MNT
    Album: Laisse pas trainer ton TIN

  13. #13

    Date d'inscription
    février 2007
    Localisation
    Montreal
    Emploi
    Géomaticien
    Organisme
    Vélo-Québec
    Âge
    42
    Messages
    48

    Par défaut Re : Des jolies cartes en oursins

    Merci pour l'info... Mais cette fonction fait partie du module Business Analyst... qui est payant
    L'outil Spider qui était développé par une personne de chez ESRI semblait être gratuite.

    bonne journée

    T.

  14. #14
    Rédacteur Supporter(rice)


    Date d'inscription
    octobre 2010
    Localisation
    22
    Emploi
    SIG Réseaux humides
    Âge
    39
    Messages
    492

    Par défaut Re : Des jolies cartes en oursins

    Bonjour,

    Je confirme que l'outil Spider était gratuit. Reste à savoir s'il est compatible avec des versions 10.x...
    Fichiers attachés Fichiers attachés
    Merci de faire le suivi de vos messages.
    Si vous avez obtenu une réponse sur un autre forum, merci d'indiquer le lien vers cette réponse.
    Vous pouvez agir sur la réputation des membres en cliquant sur cette icône :


  15. #15

    Date d'inscription
    février 2007
    Localisation
    Montreal
    Emploi
    Géomaticien
    Organisme
    Vélo-Québec
    Âge
    42
    Messages
    48

    Par défaut Re : Des jolies cartes en oursins

    Bonjour kant_ein,

    Merci pour la réponse.
    Je n'arrive pas à télécharger la pièce-jointe.... c'est en attente de validation, est-ce normal ?

    Merci encore

 

 
Page 1 sur 2 12 DernièreDernière

Discussions similaires

  1. [MapInfo 7.x] Carte oursins
    Par Romain06 dans le forum Assistance Technique
    Réponses: 7
    Dernier message: 25/10/2012, 16h39
  2. [ArcGIS 9.x] Création d'oursins
    Par MathildeQ dans le forum Assistance Technique
    Réponses: 1
    Dernier message: 16/11/2010, 11h15
  3. [ArcGIS 9.x] Carte avec des oursins
    Par ptipimouss dans le forum Assistance Technique
    Réponses: 37
    Dernier message: 16/11/2010, 11h14
  4. [GeoConcept 5.x] Geocodage d'oursins
    Par batmatico dans le forum Assistance Technique
    Réponses: 2
    Dernier message: 10/02/2009, 02h51
  5. [Raster] Recherche cartes agglomérations jolies
    Par llby dans le forum Ressources
    Réponses: 1
    Dernier message: 01/05/2007, 00h54

Les tags pour cette discussion

Liens sociaux

Règles de messages

  • Vous ne pouvez pas créer de nouvelles discussions
  • Vous ne pouvez pas envoyer des réponses
  • Vous ne pouvez pas envoyer des pièces jointes
  • Vous ne pouvez pas modifier vos messages
  •