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  1. #1
    Biblioman
    Date d'inscription
    mai 2005
    Localisation
    Villeurbanne
    Âge
    32
    Messages
    3 237

    Par défaut Créer une carte d'aspect ancien

    La première partie, focalisée sur le rendu à l'ancienne des cours d'eau

    http://blogs.esri.com/Support/blogs/...waterways.aspx
    Historical Map Effects - Waterways


    Recently, I was trying to replicate a historic map and I would like to share a couple of the techniques I used. This first blog will show you how you can symbolize waterways so that they appear as they do on some historic maps, and the second will show you how to create a torn and creased parchment paper look for your map.
    We previously wrote a blog on symbolizing coastlines which showcased several different ways to make a coastline. I want to add a technique to this and show a way to symbolize larger scale inland waterways like the Rhine River in the map shown below. This technique mimics an old inking style that used dashed lines running parallel to the coast to delineate the shoreline. The following explains how to create those dashed lines.

    Figure 1: Historic Map
    Step one: Create the dashed lines
    Double click the waterway polygon feature class symbol in the Table of Contents to open the Symbol Selector. Next click the Edit Symbol… button to open the Symbol Property Editor. Click the Outline… button (since we are editing the polygon outline) to open the Symbol Selector. Lastly click the Edit Symbol… button to access the Symbol Property Editor.

    Figure 2: The Symbol Property Editor dialog
    Now we will be making four dashed lines. From the Type drop down menu choose the Cartographic Line Symbol option -- this will allow you to create dashed lines.

    • The first dashed line will be along the coast (no offset). Its pattern is 4 dash / 1 naught
    • The second dashed line will be offset -4. Its pattern is 2 dash / 1 naught
    • The third dashed line will be offset -9. Its pattern is 2 naught / 2 dash
    • The last dashed line will be offset -16. Its pattern is 1 dash / 3 naught

    You can play with these values but these worked well for my map. In general, you want the dashes to become smaller as they are drawn further from the shore.
    Step two: Convert to Representations
    The dashed line symbol for the waterway looks best if it is then converted to representations, because representations will help avoid the troubles that offset lines can have around bends. To do this, right click the layer in the Table of Contents and click the Convert Symbology to Representations option. Note that this will require that your data are in geodatabase rather than shapefile format.

    Once you convert to reps you can keep all the defaults and you will get the effect shown below. Notice how the corners (or bends) look a lot better.
    Figure 3: Shoreline before converting to representations

    Figure 4: Shoreline after converting to representations
    Stay tuned for part two of this blog series which describes how you can give your map a torn and creased parchment paper look.
    Thanks to Aileen Buckley for her help with this blog entry.

    Filed under: Symbology

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    About wesjones

    Wesley (Wes) Jones started with Esri in the summer of 2009. He hails from Canada where he earned a Geography Degree with a History Minor from the University of Calgary, and a Cartography Diploma from the Centre of Geographic Sciences (COGS) in Lawrencetown, Nova Scotia. During his tenure at COGS, Wesley earned several mapping accolades from the Cartography and Geographic Information Society (CAGIS), and the British Cartographic Society (BCS). Prior to coming to Esri, Wesley worked for a GIS support company, and with a planning department providing cartographic and GIS expertise.
    *******
    EDIT
    *******
    Deuxième partie, un fond parcheminé...

    http://blogs.esri.com/Support/blogs/...Parchment.aspx

    Historical Map Effects - Torn and Creased Parchment


    In my last blog entry I wrote about how to achieve a particular waterway look that you might find on a historical map. In this entry, I want to show you how you can make your map look like it has a torn parchment edge.
    Inevitably old paper maps become torn… or at least we like to think so. Therefore, having a map look a bit torn is a nice way to imply its agedness.
    Step one: Create the torn parchment effect
    Create a rectangle showing what the paper that the map is printed on would look like in an undamaged condition. You will use this to create a modified page with torn edges. You can simply create a new rectangle in an edit session (make it the size you want the parchment to be). You will use this as a guide to create a modified page with torn edges.
    Next, in an edit session using the Polygon tool on the Feature Construction Toolbar, trace the rectangle you just created. You want to make sure the snapping is on so that you are keeping the general shape of the rectangle. Then draw tears where you feel like it (as shown below). You do not need too many to achieve an old look. Save your edits

    Figure 1: This is an example of how you would draw the tear near the upper right hand corner of the parchment feature I show in this blog entry.
    Now, in the Table of Contents, right click the data frame and click properties. On the Data Frame tab under Clip Options, select the Clip to Shape option from the drop down menu. Then click the Specify Shape… button and select the torn rectangle polygon that you just finished editing. This will clip all the data in the data frame to that torn polygon shape.

    Figure 2: The Data Frame tab with the Clip to Shape option
    Step two: Adding more dimensionality to the parchment using a vignette along the edges
    To add a little more apparent dimensionality to the paper edge you can create and symbolize a buffer at the edge of the torn parchment polygon. Buffer the inside of the polygon using the Buffer Wizard tool (the step-by-step instructions are outlined in the blog entry titled Symbolizing Shorelines). Once the buffers are created, you can symbolize them using a color ramp so that the darkest browns are along the outside of the polygon giving the impression that the parchment is curling a bit at the edge.

    Figure 3: The parchment with torn edges and a buffer vignette along the edges
    And voila -- you have added the look of an old torn piece of parchment to your map!
    Step three: Adding creases to the parchment
    Additionally, you can add crease lines and texture to the parchment.
    To add crease lines, first convert the torn parchment polygon to line features using the Feature to Line tool.
    Next, in an edit session, draw two vertical lines in the parchment (these represent the folds). Start the lines at the top of the parchment polygon (making sure you have snapped to the edge of the parchment polygon) and then right click or press Control + A to access the Direction dialog box. Here type in a value of 270. This will ensure that the line is drawn straight down the page. Draw the line so that it goes to the bottom of the parchment.

    Figure 4: The Direction dialog box

    Figure 5: The crease lines
    Now buffer the lines with the Multiple Ring Buffer tool. I wanted the buffer to have more intensity closer to the edge so I typed in these buffer distances (meters): 40,30,25,20,15,13,11,9,7,6,5,4,3,2,1. Don't worry that the buffer goes beyond the parchment limit, the Clip to Shape option will clip the portions of the buffer that goes beyond the torn parchment polygon edge. Apply a color ramp again making sure that the darkest browns are along the outside edge.

    Figure 6: The crease lines and the buffers
    Apply a slight transparency to the buffer polygons and place the buffers above the torn parchment paper polygon in the Table of Contents. The result is that you will have what looks like a piece of parchment that has creases in it.

    Figure 7: The torn parchment with creases
    Step four: Adding texture to the parchment
    One last effect you could do is to give the parchment a little texture. In the Table of Contents make a copy of the parchment. On this copy instead of using a brown fill find a picture fill (I used the hacshd20.bmp fill). I changed the transparency to 92% so that it became a very subtle texture.

    Figure 5. The torn, creased parchment with texture
    And voila -- you have created the look of an old torn creased piece of parchment for your map!
    Thanks to Aileen Buckley for her help with this blog entry.

    Filed under: Symbology, Page Layout

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    Anonymous comments are disabled
    About wesjones

    Wesley (Wes) Jones started with Esri in the summer of 2009. He hails from Canada where he earned a Geography Degree with a History Minor from the University of Calgary, and a Cartography Diploma from the Centre of Geographic Sciences (COGS) in Lawrencetown, Nova Scotia. During his tenure at COGS, Wesley earned several mapping accolades from the Cartography and Geographic Information Society (CAGIS), and the British Cartographic Society (BCS). Prior to coming to Esri, Wesley worked for a GIS support company, and with a planning department providing cartographic and GIS expertise.
    Dernière modification par n314 ; 03/12/2010 à 10h32. Motif: Fusion automatique des messages postés à la suite
    Home is where the .arc is...
    Propos sous license Beerware !!!

 

 

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